SOLICITOR FINED £2,500 FOR OFFENSIVE TWEETS

Often members of the legal profession are considered true followers of the law, but a contrary may also happen, as solicitors are humans too. Mark Lewis, the former director of UK Lawyers for Israel, and a renowned media lawyer, who gained fame during the famous phone hacking saga fined £2,500 in a ruling by Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal (SDT) in London.Two charges were imposed on him regarding personal as well as professional perspectives. Firstly, he posted offensive and profane social media posts, in which he wished death to those who abused him. The tribunal quoted his tweet in which he wrote: “Happy to celebrate your death too. I have not got time for your hideous evil.” SDT conceded that Mr. Lewis continued his nonprofessional conduct over a period of 18 months, which could not be condoned.

The tribunal found that he failed to uphold confidence in the solicitors’ profession. His responding to the abuse on Twitter indicated that he had a lack of integrity required for the legal profession. In addition, the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) stated that they could not find the original hate campaign, which Mr. Lewis has taken plea against. This entire case has been of major interest to many solicitors in Lancashire.

Hence, he was not only imposed a penalty of £2,500 but also had t Often members of the legal profession are considered true followers of the law, but a contrary may also happen, as solicitors are humans too. Mark Lewis, the former director of UK Lawyers for Israel, and a renowned media lawyer, who gained fame during the famous phone hacking saga fined £2,500 in a ruling by Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal (SDT) in London.Two charges were imposed on him regarding personal as well as professional perspectives. Firstly, he posted offensive and profane social media posts, in which he wished death to those who abused him.

The tribunal quoted his tweet in which he wrote: “Happy to celebrate your death too. I have not got time for your hideous evil.” SDT conceded that Mr. Lewis continued his nonprofessional conduct over a period of 18 months, which could not be condoned. The tribunal found that he failed to uphold confidence in the solicitors’ profession. His response to the abuse on Twitter indicated that he had a lack of integrity required for the legal profession. In addition, the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) stated that they could not find the original hate campaign, which Mr. Lewis has taken plea against. Hence, he was not only imposed a penalty of £2,500 but also had to pay £10,000 in costs. Timothy Kendal represented Mr. Lewis’s defense.

The lawyer told that Mr. Lewis himself had been a victim of racial abuse on Twitter for almost three years, due to which he had to increase his security. His offensive tweets were only in response to a few of those tweets against him which also included death threats, due to which the lawyer had to increase his security as well. Mr. Lewis admitted on the Facebook that he did it, because of the side effects of a drug. Moreover, he wrote that when he realized that he committed a mistake, he tried to apologize to the boy and his father. His stance could also be supported to his talk with BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire in August 2018, when he said he will quit the UK, because he did not feel safe there, and he will shift to Israel in December.

He related all this abuse to be anti-Semitic. During the hearing, Mr. Lewis told that he did not respond to any abuse since newly published guidelines of the SRA about social media use. However, SRA believed differently.The public expressed too much interest in this case as, during the proceedings, the tribunal had to change the hearing room to accommodate more people. Other solicitors expressed that the legal professionals specialized in social media law should not be offensive on this platform and must be aware of how to behave. However, the court decision also found other views as well. In conclusion, abuse begets abuse. A diverse society like the UK cannot afford such shameful hate game and racism that is currently going on. Although solicitors are also humans, yet they should not follow personal routes for expressing extreme wishes and must remain professional.

Teenager injured after falling while ‘tram surfing’ is awarded over £500,000

Rebecca Kelly was only 13 when her and her friend decided to try out tram surfing. The girls jumped a tram in south Dublin and wedged their fingers in the door to hold on. While doing so the tram started to move, causing Kelly to fall backwards onto the tracks and hitting her head.

Tram surfing has become a popular activity for teenagers over the past few years as they will jump onto the tram and hold on for their safety, it gives them an adrenaline rush and it known to be fun and adventurous. Kelly and her mother, Elizabeth Kelly, sued the Laus operators Veolia Transport-Dublin Light-Rail LTD and the Veolia Transport Ireland LTD after the accident, which happened in September of 2010, leaving her with a brain injury. As Rebecca was laying on the tracks after falling from the tram her friend rushed to rescue her as an oncoming train was arriving.

It has been 8 years since the injury and Kelly’s persistence is finally paying off as she was recently awarded £500,000. Kelly’s claims were of negligence causing personal injury. She was very firm during this proceeding that she did not want to blame the driver for her fall. Her claim was that the tram operator was not able to see both sides of the tram prior to leaving the station. As the operator pulled up to the station, he was watching the platform at the station to watch out for all the passengers coming and going. Her claims containing poor visibility were denied as they said she knew what she was doing was dangerous and she was not thinking of her personal safety.

There has been a known issue in the UK and Ireland for years, and the trams were applied with grease and cameras to prevent this from happening. Regardless of their efforts Kelly was able to climb onto the tram, which unfortunately ended with her injury. Kelly, who has just given birth to her first child only weeks ago, has been open regarding the accident. She acknowledged that the accident was her fault as she was aware that she shouldn’t have been tram surfing. The court applauded Kelly’s honesty and decided against lecturing her regarding the accident.

The Laus tram system had 54 injuries between year 2005 to 2010 which encouraged them to add metal strips to the door so it would be difficult for people to wedge their fingers into the door. This method has been helpful in steering people away from this sport. The High Court awarded Kelly £500,000 for falling off the tram in 2010, regardless of her personal injury solicitors admitting that it was her fault.

Medical negligence payouts in Northern Ireland hit £35m over the past year

It is a tragedy where a human suffers from medical negligence. It is a shame that this has increased in the recent years. But with problem a solution accompanies. The medical negligence payouts is a way the patients can reclaim part of their losses. The care that was not given to them can be compensated in terms of either the amount the patient had to pay for his treatment or the income he lost during the time his treatment was in progress and he couldn’t attend to his work, or both. This has become a common practice in other countries too.

Statistically we can know that the cases that dealt the most damage were of pregnant women with up to 674 cases. Many of the cases in the obstetrics ward were due to the pressure the women had to face from the staff in the labour room. The babies have also been affected due to the medical negligence claims and the amount has increased at a very alarming rate. To talk about the numbers, £116.7m were paid in accordance with the law that requires the health facility to pay medical negligence payout since 2017.

The amount stated wasn’t given to the patients but most of it was spent in fighting cases against the claims of medical negligence. If the figures are to be trusted the number of complaints in emergency cases has been 629 in Northern Ireland only. It is a clear reason why the amount has increased drastically and made it to the headlines “Medical negligence payouts in Northern Ireland hit £35m over the past year”.

Apart from the obstetrics department, there has been a fair amount of negligence cases seen in emergency, trauma, general surgery and orthopaedics. The cases have been the most for people in the range of 19 and 34. In most of the cases the only reason for it to become a negligence case was that the diagnosis has been provided with a delay or the doctor took more time to provide the treatment to the patient. Another emerging cause of the allegations has been the assaults witnessed by the patients and the sexual abuse they were forced to face.

Many contributors to the economy of Northern Ireland have urged to have the hospitals and care taking units to have the right equipment to cater the needs of the patients at the earliest since sometimes even a little delay in the situation can result into something really complicated. They have claimed that the entire reason these systems are built is to make sure no patient has turned down the treatment he needs and it is thus important that all the hospitals and doctors must have the right facilities to deal with any kind of medical problem that is presented.

For all the patients that have been wronged in any way, it is suggested that you bring the case forward and talk to the right solicitor so that the problem can be solved and you can be compensated for the ill-treatment. The only thing to make your claim strong and to actually get a payout is to have solid proof against the wrong that has been done to you -since in terms of law nothing speaks louder than proofs.